Skip to content

“A penny for your inventions “– Survey evidence about the unobservable output of inventors and its possible application to the work of academic researchers/ “Un centavo por sus inventos”.Respuestas acerca de la salida no observable de los inventores y las posibles aplicaciones a los investigadores académicos

April 16, 2012

Between 2008 and 2011 the Department of Economics “Cognetti de Martiis” of the University of Turin, in collaboration with Polytechnic of Turin and Fondazione Rosselli, promoted the IAMAT (Impact of the Athenaeums on the Metropolitan Area of Turin) research project. The objective was to analyse the economic impact and spillovers created by Turin universities in the metropolitan area, as well as the impact of decentralized university campuses on the areas where they are based. In particular, the second stage of the project was aimed at understanding the effects of the research activities conducted by the Polytechnic and the University of Turin, on the innovativeness of local companies.

The aforementioned second part of the study was carried out through the PIEDINV survey, held in 2009, which collected the responses given by 938 inventors who patented at least one of their inventions at the European Patent Office[1]. The questionnaire deepened the analysis on university-industry interactions at the individual inventor-level by asking inventors about the importance, effectiveness and frequency of different types of interactions with local universities. However, a part of the questionnaire also collected information on the innovative and patenting activity of single inventors and examined the inventive and innovative output not retrievable using standardized data such as patents and citations.

While previous surveys have been administered to R&D managers and company owners, a unique feature of the PIEMINV survey is the fact that it addresses relevant questions on inventive activity directly to individual inventors[2]. One of these questions was especially unusual and interesting: “How many patented inventions have you made? How many non-patented inventions have you made?” This unique question is potentially able to give us an insight into the role of non-patented inventions in the innovative process, an issue previously addressed only at firm level by studies on the propensity to patent and appropriability of research. Both R&D managers and (even more) firm owners (the respondents of the previously-held innovation surveys) are, perhaps, not aware of all the work and the inventive steps that lead to an invention that is finally patented. So, the importance of non-patented inventions can be carefully assessed only by addressing the question to individual inventors.

Descriptive statistics of the responses show two interesting features. First, the presence of non-patented inventions is relevant: 27.8% of inventors declared to have developed, during their career, both patented and non-patented inventions. Second, even if carried out by only a third of the sample, non-patented inventions amount to 44.2% of the patented ones.

Table 1: “How many patented inventions have you made during your career? How many non-patented inventions?”

PATENTED INVENTIONS

NON PATENTED INVENTIONS

Inventions Inventors % Inventions Inventors %
0 28 3.2% 0 17 5.7%
1-2 355 40.0% 1-2 66 22.2%
3-5 255 28.8% 3-5 91 30.6%
6-10 123 13.9% 6-10 56 18.9%
11-15 56 6.3% 11-15 18 6.1%
16+ 69 7.8% 16+ 49 16.5%
886 100% 297 100%

The PIEMINV dataset permits to assess the interaction between the number of patented and non-patented inventions and many other variables, taking into account both firm and individual characteristics. Moreover, the sample covers a wide range of firms with different characteristics in various technological areas.

Some interesting results can be found using a multiple regression which takes as a dependent variable an index that shows the share of patented inventions in the total of inventions developed by each inventor and for independent variables a set of individual and firm-level characteristics[3]. First, inventors who filed one or two patents manifest a lower share of patented inventions over non-patented ones if compared to inventors who hold three or more patents. Second, women have a higher propensity for developing a higher share of patented inventions compared to non-patented ones. But the third and maybe most interesting feature is related to the number of innovations[4] carried out by inventors. Results show that inventors who developed a high number of innovations are less likely to have a higher share of patented inventions. This outcome has two major implications: the result provides evidence, at the individual-level of analysis, that patented inventions do not represent the total of the valuable part of the inventive output; it also suggests that the use of patents as innovation proxy has to be combined with complementary indicators, assessing the inventive output stemming from non-patented inventions that become innovations.

Can this approach be applied in the measurement of the scientific output of academic researchers? Bibliometric data, including patents, are often used as a proxy for the productivity of individual scholars. Moreover, even the impact of single patents and publications is often computed by using citations in studies on both inventors and scholars. Nevertheless, scholars’ research output cannot be easily quantified in economic terms or reduced to the equivalent of the production of inventions and innovations. In fact, if it cannot be neglected that an inventor’s output is constituted by the tacit knowledge that is spread amongst his/her colleagues, it seems possible to recognize that his or her productivity refers to the number of inventions and innovations developed. Similarly, while we need to acknowledge that an academic scholar’s output cannot be measured exclusively through bibliometric measures, it should be reflected in the innovations of his or her colleagues, students or firm partners, and even in the advance of society as a whole, which is particularly difficult to measure.

Paolo Cecchelli, Fondazione Rosselli, Turin, Italy

The author would like to thank his Master’s  Thesis supervisor,
Professor Aldo Geuna, and Dr. Cornelia Lawson
for their help in writing this article


[1] The Final Report of the survey is downloadable at: http://www.fondazionerosselli.it/User.it/index.php?PAGE=Sito_it/attivita_ricerche1&rice_id=515
 
[2] A stream or research began with the PatVal-EU survey and continued with The Georgia Tech-RIETI project
 
[3] The propensity index is computed by dividing the number of patented inventions by the sum of patented and non-patented ones. Regression variables can be divided in Firm variables: Technological intensity (dummy), Size, Quality of patent portfolio; Individual variables: Age, Gender (dummy), Higher Education (dummy), Mobility, Single or Double Patentees (dummy), Innovations, Most common technology class of patenting (dummy), Quality of an inventor’s portfolio.El índice de tendencia se calcula dividiendo el número de inventos patentados por la suma de los patentados y no patentados. Las variables de regresión se puede dividir en las variables de las empresas: intensidad tecnológica (ficticio), el tamaño, la calidad de la cartera de patentes, y las variables individuales: edad, sexo (ficticio), de Educación Superior (ficticio), de movilidad, titulares de patentes simple o doble (ficticio), las innovaciones, la tecnología más común según el tipo de las patentes (ficticio), de Calidad de la trayectoria de un inventor.
 
[4] The number of innovations (defined as the number of inventor’s inventions that “have been commercialized as a product, or used in any production process in your firm or elsewhere”) was asked in a separate question.  El número de innovaciones (que se define como el número de invenciones de un inventor que “se han comercializado como un producto o utilizado en cualquier proceso de producción en su empresa o en otra parte”) se preguntó en una pregunta separada.

 

Entre 2008 y 2011 el Departamento de Economía “Cognetti de Martiis” de la Universidad de Turín, en colaboración con el Politécnico de Turín y de la Fondazione Rosselli, promovió el proyecto de investigación IAMAT (Impacto de los Ateneos en el Área Metropolitana de Turín). El objetivo de este trabajo fue analizar el impacto económico y los efectos secundarios creados por las universidades de Turín en el área metropolitana, así como el impacto de los campus universitarios descentralizados en las áreas en las que se basan. En particular, la segunda etapa del proyecto tuvo como objetivo comprender los efectos de las actividades de investigación llevadas a cabo por la Universidad Politécnica y la Universidad de Turín, en la capacidad de innovación de las empresas locales.

La parte del estudio mencionada formó parte de la segunda fase del proyecto y se llevó a cabo a través de la encuesta PIEDINV, realizada en 2009, que recogió las respuestas dadas por 938 inventores que patentaron al menos uno de sus inventos en la Oficina Europea de Patentes. El cuestionario profundizó en el análisis de las interacciones entre universidad e industria con el individuo inventor, preguntando a los inventores sobre la importancia, la eficacia y la frecuencia de diferentes tipos de interacciones con las universidades locales. Del mismo modo, una parte del cuestionario también recogió información sobre la actividad innovadora y las patentes de los inventores individuales y examinó cómo los resultados de la investigación y la innovación no son recuperables usando datos estandarizados, como las patentes y las citas.

Si bien las encuestas anteriores han sido realizadas a los coordinadores de proyectos de I + D y a los administradores y propietarios de empresas, una característica única de la encuesta PIEMINV es su forma de dirigir las cuestiones relativas a la actividad inventiva directamente a los inventores individuales. Una de estas preguntas inusuales e interesantes ha sido: “¿Cuántas invenciones patentadas ha hecho? ¿Cuántas invenciones no patentadas ha hecho? “. Esta pregunta es potencialmente capaz de dar una visión sobre el papel de los inventos no patentados en el proceso de innovación, un tema abordado anteriormente sólo a nivel de empresa por los estudios sobre la propensión a las patentes y a la propiedad del conocimiento. Tanto los investigadores que desarrollan I + D y (aún más) los propietarios de empresas (los encuestados sobre innovación con anterioridad), tal vez no son conscientes de todo el trabajo y los pasos que el desarrollo de una invención que finalmente se patenta. Por lo tanto, la importancia de las invenciones no patentadas puede ser evaluada cuidadosamente sólo tratando la cuestión con los inventores individuales.

La estadística descriptiva de las respuestas muestra dos características interesantes. En primer lugar, la presencia de las invenciones no patentadas es relevante: el 27,8% de los inventores declara que ha desarrollado, durante su carrera, ambos inventos patentados y no patentados. En segundo lugar, incluso si se lleva a cabo por sólo un tercio de la muestra, las invenciones no patentadas equivalen al 44,2% de las patentadas.

Tabla 1: “¿Cuántas invenciones patentadas ha realizado en su carrera? ¿Cuántas invenciones no patentadas ha realizado?

PATENTED INVENTIONS

NON PATENTED INVENTIONS

Inventions Inventors % Inventions Inventors %
0 28 3.2% 0 17 5.7%
1-2 355 40.0% 1-2 66 22.2%
3-5 255 28.8% 3-5 91 30.6%
6-10 123 13.9% 6-10 56 18.9%
11-15 56 6.3% 11-15 18 6.1%
16+ 69 7.8% 16+ 49 16.5%
  886 100%   297 100%

El conjunto de datos PIEMINV permite evaluar la interacción entre el número de inventos patentados y no patentados y muchas otras variables, teniendo en cuenta tanto las características de las empresas como las de los investigadores particulares. Por otra parte, la muestra abarca un amplio abanico de empresas con características diferentes en diversas áreas tecnológicas.

Algunos resultados interesantes se pueden encontrar a partir de una regresión múltiple, que tome como una variable dependiente el índice que muestra la participación de las invenciones patentadas en el total de las invenciones desarrolladas por cada inventor y para las variables independientes una serie de características a nivel de empresa. En primer lugar, los inventores que presentaron uno o dos patentes manifiestan una menor proporción de las invenciones patentadas en no patentados si se compara con los inventores que tienen tres o más patentes. En segundo lugar, las mujeres tienen una mayor propensión a desarrollar una mayor proporción de las invenciones patentadas en comparación con las no patentadas. Pero la característica tercera y quizás más interesante se refiere al número de innovaciones llevadas a cabo por los inventores. Los resultados muestran que los inventores que desarrollaron un gran número de innovaciones son menos propensos a tener una mayor proporción de las invenciones patentadas. Este resultado tiene dos consecuencias importantes: el resultado proporciona evidencia que a nivel de análisis individual, las invenciones patentadas no representan el total del valor de las invenciones, sino que sugiere que el uso de las patentes como proxy de la innovación ha sido combinado con indicadores complementarios, la evaluación de la salida de la invención derivada de la invenciones no patentadas que se convierten en innovaciones.

¿Puede tener este método una aplicación en la medición de la producción científica de los investigadores académicos? Datos bibliométricos, incluidas las patentes, se utilizan a menudo como un indicador de la productividad de los investigadores individuales. Además, incluso el impacto de las patentes y publicaciones individuales a menudo se calcula mediante el uso de citas en los estudios de los inventores y académicos. Sin embargo, la producción de investigación académica no puede cuantificarse fácilmente en términos económicos o reducirse al equivalente de la producción de invenciones e innovaciones.

Mientas no se debe olvidar que la producción de un inventor está constituida por el conocimiento tácito que se extiende entre los colegas, parece posible reconocer que su productividad se refiere al número de inventos e innovaciones desarrolladas. Del mismo modo, mientras que tenemos que reconocer que la producción erudita  académica no se puede medir exclusivamente a través de medidas bibliométricos, se debe reflejar en las innovaciones de sus colegas, sus estudiantes o socios de las firmas, e incluso en el avance de la sociedad en su conjunto – lo que es particularmente difícil de medir.

Paolo Cecchelli, Fondazione Rosselli, Turin, Italy

El autor desea agradecer a su supervisor Tesis de Maestría,
Profesor Aldo Geuna, y la Dra. Cornelia Lawson
por su ayuda en la redacción de este artículo
No comments yet

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: