Skip to content

The Iberoamerican collaboration network in nanotechnology/ La red de colaboración Iberoamericana en nanotechnology

March 12, 2012

In the article entitled Collaboration in nanotechnology through Social Network Analysis, we presented the position of the Iberoamerican countries in the international network of research in nanotechnology. From that information, it is possible to trace the density of the collaboration between the countries of the region, which is the topic of the present post. But before starting with the analysis, let us recall the methodological procedure we explained in the former post.

 The networks of scientific production in nanotechnology studied in the present report were built upon publications in Science Citation Index (SCI), the main international bibliographical database.

 Given that the existing number of nodes and relationships is very extensive, which hinders their visualization and analysis, pruning techniques have been applied. They consist in the application of algorithms that eliminate less important links in the network leaving only the minimum necessary so as not to disconnect any node. The reason for this is that the weight of the resulting total of spans (in this case, the number of joint publications) is as great as possible. This provides the basic structure underlying a highly complex network. The result of the pruning techniques is a minimum spanning tree (MST) of a graph. In this case, the Prim algorithm has been used.

 Publishing joint articles is one of the ways of consolidating the Iberoamerican knowledge space. Changes in the general integration of the network of co-publications may be quantified according to the density indicator, which shows the number of existing links over the total of potential links.

 In order to observe the interactions between the Iberoamerican countries involved in the nanotechnology research, we will first provide an overview of co-authored articles. Two years have been taken to show the evolution of this collaborative space, 2000 and 2007.

 Graph 1 and 2 show the composition of the nanotechnology network in 2000 and 2007, respectively. The diameter of the circles represents the number of articles published; the thickness of the lines indicates the number of joint publications; and the colours of the nodes show the proportion of the Iberoamerican collaboration in the production of knowledge in the nanotechnology field in relation to the world production.

 Graph 1: Network of Iberoamerican countries (2000)

Graph 1 shows the composition of the nanotechnology network in 2000.

 Source: authors’ graph from SCI-WOS data

We observe that in 2000 there was a strongly connected group producing nanotechnology research results in the region; this group was made up of the most productive countries and, in its periphery, of countries with a lower volume of production. There also appeared 4 other countries with a lower volume of production in nanotechnology research and with no connection to other Iberoamerican countries.

 Spain and Brazil occupied the central place in terms of number of publications and density. Even if both countries appeared as network coordinators, the relationship between them was relatively weak with respect to the volume of production and their relationships with other countries.

 In 2000, the Iberoamerican countries which produced more research results in nanotechnology were also those for which the collaboration with the other counties of the region represented a volume lower than their own production. These countries were Spain, Brazil, Mexico, Portugal and Argentina, all with values below 20%. If countries with lower nanotechnology production (with a share lower than 1% of the overall Iberoamerican production – see table 1 below) are left aside, we see that those of medium development are those which interacted more within the region. They were: Chile, Colombia and Venezuela, with figures between 20% and 40%; Cuba had 70% of its articles written in collaboration with authors from the region.

 Graph 2: Network of Iberoamerican countries (2007)

Graph 2 shows the composition of the nanotechnology network in 2007.

Source: authors’ own graph from SCI-WOS data

In graph 2, we can see how in 2007 Spain consolidated its central role: it overtook Brazil in terms of number of publications, intensity and diversity of collaboration with the rest of the countries of the Iberoamerican region. Also, Cuba and Uruguay reached 76% and 65% respectively in Iberoamerican collaboration. We can also see that, in general, in 2007 the overall density of regions’ network was much greater than in 2000 with only 1 country (Bolivia) with no connections with other countries of the region.

All in all, we can observe that many countries suffered important variations in the density of their interactions in nanotechnology research within the region along the time frame. For example, Brazil increased its collaboration from 8% (2000) to 11% (2007) while Portugal lowered it from 15% (2000) to 11% (2000). On the other hand, Argentina went from 19% (2000) to 27% (2007), a rate of variation which is an example of the most dramatic growth. Argentina also experienced an important development in the collaboration with Brazil leading to the creation in 2005 of the Argentine-Brazilian Centre of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (Centro Argentino-Brasilero de Nanociencia y Nanotecnología, CABNN). Likewise, Chile and Colombia experienced equally noticeable changes, albeit with a lower volume of production; Chile went from 22% (2000) to 39% (2007) and Colombia went from 26% (2000) to 49% (2007).

Different indicators of social network analysis can be used to obtain quantitative measurements of the position of the countries in the network of collaboration in nanotechnology research, the normalised degree being the simplest one. This indicator is given by the number of nodes with which one node is connected and is normalised by the total number of possible relations. This measurement shows each node’s degree of direct exposure to the information circulating in the network. Noticeably, the number of ties that a given institution has correlates with the number of its publications.

Graph 3 shows the distribution of the Iberoamerican countries which are leaders in nanotechnology production (the data used for this graph is presented in table 1). The horizontal axis (X) shows the percentage share of the total regional production whereas the vertical axis (Y) shows the normalised degree of each node. The data for 2000 is in blue and for 2007 in red; the colours facilitate the visualisation of the evolution of each country in the context of the network. Also, a regression line has been drawn to show the relative position of each country in relation to the group.

 Graph 3: Normalized degree and participation in Iberoamerican production

Source: authors’ own graph from SCI-WOS data

Spain shows an evolution in the volume of nanotechnology production which goes from 44% (2000) to 50% (2007). Not only did the centrality of this country in the regional network increased in absolute terms (from 0.62 to 0.78), but it also did so in relation to the rest of the countries appearing slightly above the regression line in the last year of the analysis.

Two other countries followed Spain in nanotechnology production; Brazil and Mexico, yet they did not experience a rate of growth as sustained as Spain. Both countries showed little variation in their relative participation in the regional production whereas the degree indicator values increased less than the regional average.

Portugal followed Spain, Brazil and Mexico in terms of production volume. However, this country showed a different trend; although its participation in the regional production increased from 6.87% in 2000 to 10.48% in 2007, no similar increase was observed in its network integration, and it maintained very low-degree values in relation to the other Iberoamerican countries. The opposite happened with Argentina, which occupied the fifth place in terms of the volume of nanotechnology production. Argentina maintained a stable share of participation in the regional production and increased its ties within the region. In 2007 it reached the central position (measured by the normalized degree) equivalent to that of Brazil.

Chile’s position in terms of participation in the regional production and its relative centrality was similar in 2000 and 2007–this happened in the context of a growing density of the network. In contrast, Colombia experienced a decrease in its participation in the Iberoamerican production and in its centrality by over 1 point. Furthermore, even though its degree indicator increased in absolute terms, it did so less sharply than the rest of the countries, as shown in its position in relation to the regression line drawn on the graph.

 Table 1: Normalised degree and participation in Iberoamerican production

COUNTRY

Participation in Iberoamerican production

2000

Degree

2000

Participation in Iberoamerican production

2007

Degree

2007

Spain

44.24%

0.625

50.45%

0.786

Brazil

25.71%

0.563

25.54%

0.643

Mexico

12.82%

0.438

11.17%

0.500

Portugal

6.87%

0.125

10.48%

0.357

Argentina

7.38%

0.250

7.26%

0.643

Chile

2.33%

0.313

2.87%

0.571

Colombia

2.53%

0.313

1.28%

0.429

Venezuela

2.07%

0.375

1.11%

0.214

Cuba

2.46%

0.313

1.02%

0.500

Uruguay

0.26%

0.125

0.51%

0.214

Peru

0,26%

0.063

0.39%

0.357

Panama

0.06%

0.000

0.18%

0.143

Ecuador

0.13%

0.063

0.15%

0.143

Costa Rica

0.19%

0.000

0.12%

0.071

Bolivia

0.06%

0.063

0.06%

0.000

There is another way of seeing the place of the countries in the regional network of collaboration in nanotechnology; in terms of their intermediation in the information spans. The intermediation indicator shows the frequency with which a node appears in the shortest span between 2 others; this measurement can be interpreted as an indicator of the capacity of this node to control the flow of information. In our case, each node is an Iberoamerican country.Source: Author’s own table from SCI-WOS data

Graph 4 shows the distribution of the main Iberoamerican countries in terms of their participation in regional production (the data used for this graph is presented in table 2 which includes the totality of the Iberoamerican countries with production in nanotechnology during the timespan of 2000-2007). The horizontal axis (X) shows the countries’ participation in the total regional production whereas the vertical axis (Y) shows their intermediation. The data for 2000 is in blue and for 2007 in red; as with former graph, the colours facilitate the visualisation of the evolution of each country in the context of the network. Here a regression line has also been drawn to show the relative position of each country in relation to the group.

Graph 4: Intermediation and participation in Iberoamerican production

 Source: authors’ own graph from SCI-WOS data

As shown in the graph, even though Spain’s participation in the regional production in nanotechnology between 2000 and 2007 increased, the intermediation of this country decreased. In this sense, the position of Spain in the network became less critical towards 2007: then there were more spans between the countries of the region which reduced their need to turn to the most prolific ones. This is consistent with the above-mentioned increase in the density of the network and with the growing integration of the Iberoamerican space.

Unlike Spain, Brazil and Argentina strongly increased their intermediation both in absolute terms as well as in the context of the Iberoamerican nanotechnology network. As a result, and in the context of Spain’s less critical position, these countries acquired a more significant role as articulators within the regional network: they acted as bridges between less-developed countries in the field of nanotechnology.

The third country in terms of volume of production was Mexico. Unlike Brazil and Argentina, this country experienced a marked decrease in intermediation (from 0.098 in 2000 to 0.022 in 2007). Thus, despite having been directly connected with the network’s most important nodes, it did not appear as a crucial node for the information through countries with lower production to flow.

Last, Portugal barely increased its intermediation within the time frame (its intermediation value was 0 in 2000 and 0.006 in 2007).

To conclude, if we consider the network as a whole, the volume of the countries’ scientific production and the relationships between themselves, what comes to the fore is the growing importance that the Iberoamerican space of knowledge in the field of nanotechnology is acquiring. It is important to highlight that the regional collaboration becomes more important for medium-developed countries which seemed to have found in the Iberoamerican cooperation a fertile ground for the consolidation of their research and development capacities.

Table 2: Normalized degree and participation in Iberoamerican production

COUNTRY

Participation in Iberoamerican production

2000

Intermediation 2000

Participation in Iberoamerican

production

2007

Intermediation  2007

Spain

44.24% 0.187 50.45% 0.176

Brazil

25.71% 0.095 25.54% 0.168

Mexico

12.82% 0.098 11.17% 0.022

Portugal

6.87% 0.000 10.48% 0.006

Argentina

7.38% 0.000 7.26% 0.090

Chile

2.33% 0.093 2.87% 0.096

Colombia

2.53% 0.002 1.28% 0.004

Venezuela

2.07% 0.020 1.11% 0.000

Cuba

2.46% 0.013 1.02% 0.068

Uruguay

0.26% 0.000 0.51% 0.000

Peru

0.26% 0.000 0.39% 0.006

Panama

0.06% 0.000 0.18% 0.000

Ecuador

0.13% 0.000 0.15% 0.002

Costa Rica

0.19% 0.000 0.12% 0.000

Bolivia

0.06% 0.000 0.06% 0.000

 Source: authors’ table from SCI-WOS data

Author:Rodolfo Barrere and Natalia Bas

En el artículo titulado Colaboración en nanotecnología a través de la red social, presentamos la posición de los países iberoamericanos en la red internacional de investigación en nanotecnología. Desde esa información, es posible trazar la densidad de colaboración entre los países de la región, que es tema del presente post. Pero antes de comenzar con el análisis, recordaremos nuestro procedimiento metodológico.

Las redes de producción científica en nanotecnología que se estudian en este artículo se basas en las publicaciones de Science Citation Index (SCI), la principal base de datos bibliográfica internacional.

Dado que el número de nodos y relaciones es muy extenso, lo que dificulta su visualización y análisis, se han aplicado técnicas de poda. Éstas consisten en la aplicación de algoritmos que eliminan los enlaces menos importantes en la red, dejando sólo el mínimo necesario para que no se desconecten los nodos. La razón para esto es que el peso total de los enlaces (en este caso del número de publicaciones conjuntas) es el más amplio posible. El resultado de las técnicas de poda es la mínima expansión en el gráfico (MST). En este caso ha sido utilizado el algoritmo de Prim.

La publicación de artículos conjuntos es una de las formas de integración que se adopta en el espacio iberoamericano del conocimiento. Los cambios en la integración general de la red de co-publicación pueden ser cuantificados de acuerdo al indicador de densidad, que muestra el número de vínculos existentes  sobre el total de los posibles vínculos.

Con el fin de observar las interacciones entre los países de la región iberoamericana involucrados en la investigación en nanotecnología, nos centramos en primer lugar en artículos colaborativos. Se han tomado dos años para mostrar la evolución de este espacio de colaboración, 2000 y 2007.

Los gráficos 1 y 2 muestran la composición de la red de nanotecnología en 2000 y 2007, respectivamente. El diámetro de los círculos representa el número de artículos publicados, el grosor de las líneas indican el número de publicaciones conjuntas, y el color de los nodos muestra la proporción de colaboración iberoamericana en la producción del conocimiento en el campo de la nanotecnología en relación con la producción mundial.

El gráfico 1 muestra la composición de la red de nanotecnología en 2000.

Gráfico 1: Red de países iberoamericanos (2000)

Fuente: gráfico de los autores basado en los datos de SCI-WOS

Observamos que en el año 2000 hay un grupo fuertemente conectado en la producción de investigación sobre nanotecnología en la región; este grupo estaba formado principalmente por los países más productivos, y en la periferia, por países con un menor volumen de producción. También aparecen otros cuatro países con un menor volumen  de producción en investigación en nanotecnología y sin conexión con otros países de Iberoamérica.

España y Brasil ocupaban el lugar central en términos de número de publicaciones y densidad. Aunque ambos países aparecen como coordinadores de redes, las relaciones entre ellos eran relativamente débiles con respecto al volumen de producción y sus relaciones con otros países.

En 2000, los países iberoamericanos que producían más investigación en nanotecnología fueron aquellos para los que también la colaboración con los otros países de la región presentaba un volumen menor a su propia producción. Esos países fueron España, Brasil, México, Portugal y Argentina, teniendo valores por debajo del 20%. Si países con menor producción en nanotecnología (con un una participación menor al 1% del total de la producción iberoamericana- véase el cuadro 1) se dejan a un lado, se ve que aquellos con un desarrollo medio son los que interactúan más dentro de la región. Estos son: Chile, Colombia y Venezuela, con cifras entre el 20% y el 40%; Cuba tenía el 70% de los artículos escritos en colaboración con autores de la región.

El gráfico 2 muestra la composición de la red de nanotecnología en 2007.

Gráfico 2: Red de países iberoamericanos (2007)

Fuente: gráfico de los autores basado en los datos de SCI-WOS

En el gráfico 2 se puede ver como en 2007 España consolida su papel central: superó a Brasil en el número de publicaciones, intensidad y diversidad de las colaboraciones con el resto de países de la región iberoamericana. También, Cuba y Uruguay alcanzaron el 76% respectivamente en colaboraciones iberoamericanas. Podemos observar también, de forma general, que en 2007 la densidad global de las regiones de la red fue mucho mayor que en el año 2000, con sólo un país (Bolivia) sin conexiones con otros países de la región.

En definitiva, podemos apreciar que muchos países sufrieron importantes variaciones en la densidad de sus relaciones en investigación sobre nanotecnología dentro de la región a lo largo del tiempo. Por ejemplo, Brasil incrementaba sus colaboraciones del 8% (2000) al 11% (2007); Portugal, en cambio, desciende de 15% (2000) a 11% (2007). Por otro lado, Argentina fue del 19% (2000) al 27% (2007), una tasa de variación que hace que sea el ejemplo más significativo. Argentina también experimentó un importante desarrollo en la colaboración con Brasil, creando en 2005 el Centro Argentino-Brasileño de Nanotecnología (Centro Argentino-Brasilero de Nanotecnología, CABNN). Asimismo, Chile y Colombia experimentaron también importantes cambios, aunque con menor volumen de producción, Chile pasó del 22% (2000) al 39% (2007) y Colombia del 26% (2000) al 49% (2007).

Los diferentes indicadores del análisis de la red pueden ser usados para obtener medidas cuantitativas de la posición de los países en la red de colaboración en investigación sobre nanotecnología  siendo el más simple el grado normalizado. Este indicador viene dado por el número de nodos con que nodo está conectado y se normaliza por el número total de posibles relaciones. Esta medida muestra el grado que cada nodo tiene de exposición a la información que circula en la red. Notablemente, el número de empates que una tiene una institución tiene correlación con el número de publicaciones.

El gráfico 3 muestra la distribución de los países Iberoamericanos líderes en producción en nanotecnología (los datos usados para este gráfico se muestran en la tabla 1) El eje horizontal (X) muestra el porcentaje de la producción total regional mientras el eje vertical (Y) muestra el grado normalizado de cada nodo. Los datos para 2000 están en azul y para 2007 en rojo; los colores facilitan la visualización de la evolución de cada país en el contexto de la red. También, una línea de regresión ha sido dibujada para mostrar la posición relativa de cada país en relación al grupo.

Gráfico 3: Grado normalizado y participación en producción iberoamericana

Fuente: gráfico de los autores basado en los datos de SCI-WOS

España muestra una evolución en el volumen de la producción en nanotecnología que va desde el 44% (2000) al 50% (2007). No sólo la centralidad de este país aumentó en la red regional en términos absolutos (0.62 a 0.78), también lo hizo en relación con al resto de países que aparecen ligeramente por encima de la línea de regresión en el último año de análisis.

Otros dos países siguen a España en producción en nanotecnología: Brasil y México, sin embargo no experimentaron una tasa de crecimiento tan sostenida como el primero. Ambos países muestran pequeña variación en su participación relativa a la producción regional mientras que el grado normalizado del árbol se incrementa menos que la media regional.

Portugal sigue a España, Brasil y México en términos de volumen de producción. No obstante, este país muestra una tendencia diferente: a pesar de que su participación en la producción regional incrementó del 6.87% en 2000 al 10.48% en 2007, no tiene un aumento similar en su integración en la red y mantiene los valores de grado muy bajos en relación con los otros países de Iberoamérica. Lo opuesto sucede con Argentina, que ocupa el quinto lugar en términos de volumen en producción de nanotecnología. Argentina mantuvo una participación estable en la producción regional y aumentó sus vínculos dentro de la región: en 2007 obtuvo un papel central (medido por el grado normalizado) equivalente al de Brasil.

La posición de Chile en términos de participación en la producción de la región y de su importancia relativa fue similar en los años 2000 y 2007, esto ocurrió en el contexto de una creciente densidad de la red.  En contraposición, Colombia experimentó un decrecimiento en su participación en la producción iberoamericana y en su centralidad en torno a un punto. Además, aunque el grado normalizado de este país creció en términos absolutos, lo hizo menos intensamente que el resto de países, como muestra su posición en relación a la línea de regresión dibujada en el gráfico.

Tabla 1: Grado normalizado y participación en la producción iberoamericana

PAIS

Participación en la producción iberoamericana- 2000

Grado

2000

Participación en la producción. iberoamericana- 2007

Grado

2007

ESPAÑA

44,24%

0,625

50,45%

0,786

BRASIL

25,71%

0,563

25,54%

0,643

MEXICO

12,82%

0,438

11,17%

0,500

PORTUGAL

6,87%

0,125

10,48%

0,357

ARGENTINA

7,38%

0,250

7,26%

0,643

CHILE

2,33%

0,313

2,87%

0,571

COLOMBIA

2,53%

0,313

1,28%

0,429

VENEZUELA

2,07%

0,375

1,11%

0,214

CUBA

2,46%

0,313

1,02%

0,500

URUGUAY

0,26%

0,125

0,51%

0,214

PERU

0,26%

0,063

0,39%

0,357

PANAMA

0,06%

0,000

0,18%

0,143

ECUADOR

0,13%

0,063

0,15%

0,143

COSTA RICA

0,19%

0,000

0,12%

0,071

BOLIVIA

0,06%

0,063

0,06%

0,000

Fuente: Gráfico de los autores basado en los datos de SCI-WOS

Hay otra manera de ver el lugar de los países en la red regional de colaboración en nanotecnología: es en términos de su intermediación en los tramos de información. El indicador de intermediación muestra la frecuencia con la que un nodo aparece en el plazo más breve posible entre otros dos; esta medida puede ser interpretada como un indicador de la capacidad de un nodo para controlar el flujo de información. En nuestro caso, cada nodo es un país iberoamericano.

El gráfico 4 muestro la distribución de los principales países iberoamericanos en términos de su participación en la producción regional (los datos usados para esta gráfica están en la tabla 2 que incluye la totalidad de los países iberoamericanos con producción en nanotecnología durante  el intervalo de tiempo 2000-2007). El eje horizontal (X) muestra la participación de los países en el total de la producción de la región, mientras que el eje vertical (Y) muestra su intermediación. Los datos para el año 2000 están en azul y para el año 2007 en rojo; como en el gráfico anterior, los colores facilitan la visualización de la evolución de cada país en el contexto de la red. También en este caso, una línea de regresión ha sido dibujada para mostrar la posición relativa de cada país en relación al grupo.

Gráfico 4: Intermediación y participación en la producción iberoamericana

Fuente: gráfico de los autores basado en los datos de SCI-WOS

Como muestra la gráfica, a pesar de que la participación de España en la producción regional en nanotecnología entre 2000 y 2007 se incrementó, la intermediación de este país disminuyó. En este sentido, la posición de España en la red  se volvió menos crítica con respecto a 2007: entonces se crearon más enlaces entre los países de la región por lo que se redujo la necesidad de recurrir a los más prolíficos. Esto se consolidó con el aumento, antes mencionado, de la densidad de la red y con la creciente integración del espacio iberoamericano.

A diferencia de España, Brasil y Argentina aumentó fuertemente su intermediación, tanto en términos absolutos como en el contexto de la red iberoamericana en nanotecnología. Como resultado, y en el contexto de la disminución de la posición crítica de España, estos países adquirieron un rol más significativo como articuladores dentro de la red regional: ellos actuaron como puentes entre los países menos desarrollados en el campo de la nanotecnología.

El tercer país en terminar de valor de producción fue México. A diferencia de Brasil y Argentina, este país experimentó un marcado descenso en su intermediación (desde 0.098 en 2000 a 0.022 en 2007). Por lo tanto, no aparece como un nodo fundamental para la información a través de los países con menor producción de flujo.

Por ultimo, Portugal apenas incrementó su intermediación en la franja de tiempo (su valor de intermediación fue 0 en 2000 y 0.006 en 2007).

Para concluir, si se considera la red como un todo, el volumen de la producción científica de los países y las relaciones entre ellos, viene a primer plano la creciente importancia que el espacio iberoamericano del conocimiento  en el campo de la nanotecnología está adquiriendo. Es importante destacar que la colaboración regional se vuelve más importante para los países medio desarrollados y subdesarrollados, que parecen haber encontrado en la cooperación iberoamericana un terreno fértil para la consolidación de sus investigaciones y el desarrollo de sus capacidades.

Tabla 2: Valor de normalización y participación en la producción iberoamericana

PAIS

Participación en la producción iberoamericana

2000

Intermediación

2000

Participación en la producción iberoamericana

2007

Intermediación

2007

ESPAÑA 44,24% 0,187 50,45% 0,176
BRASIL 25,71% 0,095 25,54% 0,168
MEXICO 12,82% 0,098 11,17% 0,022
PORTUGAL 6,87% 0,000 10,48% 0,006
ARGENTINA 7,38% 0,000 7,26% 0,090
CHILE 2,33% 0,093 2,87% 0,096
COLOMBIA 2,53% 0,002 1,28% 0,004
VENEZUELA 2,07% 0,020 1,11% 0,000
CUBA 2,46% 0,013 1,02% 0,068
URUGUAY 0,26% 0,000 0,51% 0,000
PERU 0,26% 0,000 0,39% 0,006
PANAMA 0,06% 0,000 0,18% 0,000
ECUADOR 0,13% 0,000 0,15% 0,002
COSTA RICA 0,19% 0,000 0,12% 0,000
BOLIVIA 0,06% 0,000 0,06% 0,000
Author:Rodolfo Barrere and Natalia Bas
2 Comments leave one →
  1. March 12, 2012 16:00

    Creemos que es fundamental la generación de este tipo de notas para poder orientar a las pymes en lo importante que les va a resultar la innovación nano-tecnológica. Por eso, Nanotec Latina (Argentina) y Nanotec Red (española) somos empresas del sector privado dedicadas a la Transferencia de Nanotecnología, representamos empresas Nanotecnológicas de todo el mundo en Argentina, España y América Latina, a través de nuestras páginas web en español: http://www.nanotecred.com y http://www.nanoteclatina.com

    • March 13, 2012 10:39

      Gracias por vuestra aportación y por compartir el interés por la nanotecnología y la transferencia de conocimiento.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: